FORA.tv Speaker - Jeffrey Pfeffer

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Biography

Jeffrey Pfeffer is the Thomas D. Dee II Professor of Organizational Behavior at the Graduate School of Business, Stanford University, where he has taught since 1979. Considered one of today’s most influential management thinkers, he has authored or co-authored thirteen books including:
  • The Human Equation: Building Profits by Putting People First
  • Hidden Value: How Great Companies Achieve Extraordinary Results with Ordinary People
  • Hard Facts, Dangerous Half-Truths, and Total Nonsense: Profiting from Evidence-Based Management
  • What Were They Thinking? Unconventional Wisdom About Management
  • Power: Why Some People Have It—And Others Don’t

Dr. Pfeffer received his B.S. and M.S. degrees from Carnegie-Mellon University and his Ph.D. from Stanford. He began his career at the business school at the University of Illinois and then taught at the University of California, Berkeley. Pfeffer has been a visiting professor at the Harvard Business School, Singapore Management University, London Business School, and for the past 8 years a visitor at IESE in Barcelona.

Pfeffer currently serves on the board of directors of the nonprofit Quantum Leap Healthcare. In the past he has served on the boards of Resumix, Unicru, and Workstream, all human capital software companies, Audible Magic, an internet company, SonoSite, a company designing and manufacturing portable ultrasound machines, and the San Francisco Playhouse, a non-profit theater. Pfeffer has presented seminars in 37 countries throughout the world as well as doing consulting and providing executive education for numerous companies, associations, and universities in the United States.

Jeffrey Pfeffer has won the Richard I. Irwin Award presented by the Academy of Management for scholarly contributions to management and numerous awards for his articles and books. In November, 2011, he was presented with an honorary doctorate degree from Tilburg University in The Netherlands.

1 Program