FORA.tv Speaker - Michael Moritz

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Biography

Michael L. Moritz, MD, completed his medical school and residency at the University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine. He completed his fellowship in pediatric nephrology at Texas Children's Hospital and from there he moved on to the Albert Einstein College of Medicine where he was medical director of the pediatric dialysis unit. He joined the Children's Hospital of Pittsburghof UPMC faculty in 1999 where he is currently Professor of Pediatrics, the Medical Director of Pediatric Dialysis and Clinical Director of the Division of Nephrology. Dr. Moritz serves on the editorial board of numerous professional journals. Dr. Moritz has been recognized for his outstanding clinical work, teaching and research. He has won the faculty-teaching award at both The University of Chicago and Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC and also was a recipient of the ACES award for the outstanding clinical faculty at Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC. Dr. Moritz is also a member of the Society for Pediatric Research.

Dr. Moritz's is an authority on disorders in sodium and water metobolism in children, publishing and lecturing extensively on this topic. He has done seminal work in this field, pointing out the dangers of using hypotonic fluids in hospitalized children as it has resulted in numerous cases of iatrogenic death or permanent neurological injury. Dr. Moritz was the first to recommend the use of 0.9% sodium chloride in maintenance fluids in hospitalized children as prophylaxis against developing hospital acquired hyponatremia. He has been the primary advocate in this field, which has led to a change in fluid managment practices throughout the world. Dr. Moritz also developed a strategy to use intermittent boluses of 3% sodium chloride to treat hyponatremic encephalopathy which has now become the standard of care. Dr. Moritz is also as expert in the epidemiology and treatment of hypernatremia in children, in particular breastfeeding-associated hypernatremia and salt poisoning.

1 Program

Specialty Research and Frontiers Journals

11.09.15 | 00:11:39 min | 0 comments