#mediaX2017 Conference


April 20, 2017 8:30 AM -
April 20, 2017 5:00 PM
Technology augments our sense-making - helping us filter signals, manipulate data and create representations. How does the interactive human-machine sense-making process work? How might technology align with human scale, timing and representation to make it work better? How might human fundamentals help us create technologies that will enhance the human experience?

Agenda


Thursday, April 20


8:30 am PDT Kicking Things Off     Watch On-Demand
TAPTH@T is the only advanced tap dance performing group at Stanford University. We strive to bring tap dancing to the forefront of dance culture by fusing a wide variety of styles and musical genres, as well as improvisation, constantly pushing the envelope when it comes to tap performance and improvisation. All pieces are examples of student choreography-past performances have been choreographed to music by Michael Jackson, Beyoncé, and Vance Joy, as well as from the Disney musical Mulan!

Choreography by TAPTH@T and Sarah Reich
8:35 am PDT A Welcome to Collaboration and an Invitation to Discovery     Watch On-Demand
Martha Russell is Executive Director of mediaX at Stanford University, Senior Research Scholar at the Human Sciences Technology Advanced Research Institute, and Senior Research Fellow at the Institute for Creativity and Capital at The University of Texas at Austin. Dr. Russell leads business alliances and interdisciplinary research for mediaX at Stanford University. With people and technology as the intersecting vectors in many media contexts, Dr. Russell has established collaborative research initiatives in ICT and technology leadership - for national agencies and for technology companies. She pioneered one of the first US public-private partnerships in microelectronic and information science and also in manufacturing technologies. With a focus on the power of shared vision, Dr. Russell has developed planning/evaluation systems and consulted regionally and internationally on technology innovation for regional development.

Dr. Russell studies relationship systems - people to people, to their brands, to their organizations, and for innovation. Using data-driven visualizations, her recent studies have take innovation's pulse and tracked the evolution of innovation ecosystems in digital media, learning technologies, and sensors. She has applied insights about relational capital and decision analytics to corporate, regional and national challenges. Dr. Russell serves as an advisor to the Journal of Technology Forecasting and Social Change, the Journal of Enterprise Transformation and several startup companies.
8:40 am PDT Centennial Recognition     Watch On-Demand
Dan Schwartz is Dean of Stanford Graduate School of Education and an expert in human learning and educational technology. Schwartz oversees a laboratory whose computer-focused developments in science and math instruction permit original research into fundamental questions of learning. He has taught math in rural Kenya, English in south-central Los Angeles, and multiple subjects in Kaltag, Alaska. This diversity of experience informs his work.

Among many honors, Schwartz was named Graduate School of Education Teacher of the Year for 2015. His latest book, The ABCs of How We Learn: 26 Scientifically Proven Approaches, How They Work and When to Use Them, distills learning theories into practical solutions for use at home or in the classroom. NPR noted the book among the "best reads" for 2016.
8:45 am PDT Sense-Making & Making Sense: Powerful Ideas     Watch On-Demand
Humans are pre-eminently sense-making animals, seeking patterns to find order and predictability in the worlds that they experience. Because of the central roles of the physical, social and representational worlds in human cognition and sense-making, learning scientists devote particular attention to how, over the course of ontogenesis, children and adults employ their sense-making apparatus, the brain and the body, and its various sensory modalities, to engage in sense-making activities. Humans also make meanings-with spoken word and gesture, and with symbolic representations, such as those established with information and communication technologies, from written language to images, number systems, social media, programmable language expressions, tangible user interfaces, and immersive worlds and games. People expect others to produce meanings much as they do. So in interactions, we see the intertwining of humans as meaning-makers and as sense-makers.
9:00 am PDT Sense-Making in our Post AlphaGo World     Watch On-Demand
New mindsets and sense making strategies may be required. Given the crazy pace of change that we all love and hate, we, in this room, must be prepared to not only take on the emerging hard sociotechnical challenges, but also to deeply question our institutional architectures, our public policies, and forms of learning. All of these are entangled. Indeed, new AI - deep learning systems, for example - raise fundamental ethical issues while they also influence and enable new behaviors and social practices. This means that as technologists, we are now being thrown into the midst of some fundamental - if not ontological - questions. This talk will explore our rapidly changing, broadly connected and radically contingent world and the lenses needed to frame, or reframe, the challenges that technological advances have pushed forward. Making sense of all this on a daily base ain't easy but each of us, in our own way, needs to step up to this challenge. A crisis of imagination is upon us. And we must find ways to overcome the tyranny of the present.
10:00 am PDT Haptic Systems for Enhancing the Human Sense of Touch     Watch On-Demand
Haptic (touch) feedback can play myriad roles in enhancing human performance and safety in skilled tasks. In tele-operated surgical robotics, force feedback improves the ability of a human operator to effectively manipulate and explore patient tissues that are remote in distance and scale. In virtual and augmented reality, wearable and touchable devices use combinations of kinesthetic (force) and cutaneous (tactile) feedback to make rich, immersive haptic feedback both more compelling and practical. In this talk, I will present a collection of novel haptic devices, control algorithms, and user performance studies that demonstrate a wide range of effective design approaches and promising real-world applications for haptic feedback.
10:30 am PDT Engineering for Human Sense-Making     Watch On-Demand
Collaborating with Machines on the Data Wisdom Spectrum
Before machines, humans handled all tasks across the data-wisdom spectrum. Machines today perform low-level data and information processing tasks, freeing humans to concentrate on higher-level endeavors involving knowledge, understanding and wisdom. In the future, we will want machines to collaborate with humans at the upper end of the data-wisdom spectrum, as illustrated by representative DARPA programs.

Automated Context Sensing
Automated Context Sensing projects involve designing robot or IoT behavior based on social or environmental context, as well as developing tools and applications that can sense driver/pedestrian state in automated cars or engage with them directly. For example, a navigation application that asks drivers about events in the world serves as a perfect cover story to infer their situation awareness, which then informs how the automated system should respond.

Technology to Understand Humans
"Technology to Understand Humans" is under development as a next generation core technology at OMRON. Ideas for future applications to be realized through open innovation will be shown as examples.

Digital Life Systems
Fujitsu's continuous, connected, and personalized "Digital Life" systems and services span several service verticals including healthcare/wellness and education/training, and user settings including consumer/enterprise and provider/client. Active research projects explore augmenting human, organizational, and systemic capabilities with computational sensing, analysis, and influence systems.
11:30 am PDT Neuroscience - Path to the Future     Watch On-Demand
Can the human brain ever understand itself? Professor Newsome, co-director of planning for the US BRAIN Initiative, takes us on a tour of the frontiers of contemporary neuroscience research, highlighting possibilities for revolutionary change in how we understand the brain.
1:00 pm PDT Our Multifaceted Lens     Watch On-Demand
Martha Russell is Executive Director of mediaX at Stanford University, Senior Research Scholar at the Human Sciences Technology Advanced Research Institute, and Senior Research Fellow at the Institute for Creativity and Capital at The University of Texas at Austin. Dr. Russell leads business alliances and interdisciplinary research for mediaX at Stanford University. With people and technology as the intersecting vectors in many media contexts, Dr. Russell has established collaborative research initiatives in ICT and technology leadership - for national agencies and for technology companies. She pioneered one of the first US public-private partnerships in microelectronic and information science and also in manufacturing technologies. With a focus on the power of shared vision, Dr. Russell has developed planning/evaluation systems and consulted regionally and internationally on technology innovation for regional development.

Dr. Russell studies relationship systems - people to people, to their brands, to their organizations, and for innovation. Using data-driven visualizations, her recent studies have take innovation's pulse and tracked the evolution of innovation ecosystems in digital media, learning technologies, and sensors. She has applied insights about relational capital and decision analytics to corporate, regional and national challenges. Dr. Russell serves as an advisor to the Journal of Technology Forecasting and Social Change, the Journal of Enterprise Transformation and several startup companies.
1:15 pm PDT Human 2.0 - The Future of Sense-Making     Watch On-Demand
Humans are unparalleled sense-making machines. Try as we might, there is no substitute (yet) for the human brain. At the same time, the pace of information and technological change has increased, and shows no sign of slowing. Throughout history, we have relied on technology to increase our performance and effectiveness, to great success. However, technological change is now accelerating so quickly, the human brain can no longer keep pace. Our brains have not experienced the same "upgrade" that machines have enjoyed. Compounding this issue, technology itself creates cognitive overload. How does the human sense-making machine meet this challenge? It is time to do the same thing with our wetware that we do with our hardware. To meet the sense-making challenges of the future we need to upgrade the human brain. Together we will explore the amazing features of the human brain and how we can further enhance our senses to meet the challenges of the modern world.
1:45 pm PDT Predicting Psychological Traits from Digital Footprints     Watch On-Demand
A growing proportion of human activities such as social interactions, entertainment, and gathering information, are now mediated by online social networks. Such activities can be easily recorded, offering an unprecedented opportunity to study and assess psychological traits using actual - rather than self-reported - behavior. Our research shows that digital records of behavior, such as Tweets or Facebook Likes can be used to accurately measure a wide range of psychological traits. Such Big Data assessment has a number of advantages: it does not require participants' active involvement; it can be easily and inexpensively applied to large populations; and it is relatively immune to cheating or misrepresentation. Essentially, if the ethical and methodological challenges could be overcome, Big Data has the potential to revolutionize psychological assessment, marketing, recruitment, insurance and many other industries.
2:30 pm PDT Human Sense-Making of Engineered Systems     Watch On-Demand
Making Sense of Teamwork in Remote Collaboration
Leonard's work explores how productivity and contextual measures of engagement (e.g. number of questions answered or ideas generated) are affected by differences in physical space, technological capability and cultural interactions across distributed teams. He has co-created frameworks and software tools that help make these conditions transparent and explicit across teams.

Social Media Folkonomies
Megan's work on folk theories of social feeds has examined people's implicit beliefs about how the Facebook News Feed and Twitter feed operate. Leveraging people's use of metaphors, she has found that there are four core folk theories for social feeds that tap into people's evaluation of a system, how they think the system works, and their beliefs about the system's intent.

Your Brain on Story
Haven's research has confirmed that the brain is physically hardwired to make sense in specific story terms and in specific character-based story structures. Identifying this Neural Story Net and the Eight Essential Story Elements it uses to perform its Make Sense Mandate has led to insights into how brains automatically make sense of new information and experience, and of the dominant elements that control how we create meaning from that information.
3:15 pm PDT Chasing Fire     Watch On-Demand
IT's Crucial Role in Meeting This Century's Exponential Challenges. Steeped in Moore's Law, IT professionals assume they thoroughly understand exponential phenomena. Nothing could be further from the truth, and the consequence has been two decades of neglected challenges and missed opportunities. Meeting the challenges ahead demands a fresh examination of exponential assumptions in the service of deep innovation in the digital domain. Anything less amounts to a reckless abdication of responsibility by the IT community.
4:00 pm PDT Framing the Questions for Future     Watch On-Demand
Martha Russell is Executive Director of mediaX at Stanford University, Senior Research Scholar at the Human Sciences Technology Advanced Research Institute, and Senior Research Fellow at the Institute for Creativity and Capital at The University of Texas at Austin. Dr. Russell leads business alliances and interdisciplinary research for mediaX at Stanford University. With people and technology as the intersecting vectors in many media contexts, Dr. Russell has established collaborative research initiatives in ICT and technology leadership - for national agencies and for technology companies. She pioneered one of the first US public-private partnerships in microelectronic and information science and also in manufacturing technologies. With a focus on the power of shared vision, Dr. Russell has developed planning/evaluation systems and consulted regionally and internationally on technology innovation for regional development.

Dr. Russell studies relationship systems - people to people, to their brands, to their organizations, and for innovation. Using data-driven visualizations, her recent studies have take innovation's pulse and tracked the evolution of innovation ecosystems in digital media, learning technologies, and sensors. She has applied insights about relational capital and decision analytics to corporate, regional and national challenges. Dr. Russell serves as an advisor to the Journal of Technology Forecasting and Social Change, the Journal of Enterprise Transformation and several startup companies.
4:15 pm PDT Networking Reception

About this conference


Sense-Making & Making Sense

Technology augments our sense-making - helping us filter signals, manipulate data and create representations. How does the interactive human-machine sense-making process work? How might technology align with human scale, timing and representation to make it work better? How might human fundamentals help us create technologies that will enhance the human experience?

With digital tools, on April 20th, the #mediaX2017 Conference, "Sense-Making & Making Sense" delved into the human mind as a sense-making organ, keeping as context the whole body, the whole person, in community. The communication and social sciences are already in fast pursuit of key questions, fueled by massive data. The learning, cognitive and neurosciences are entering a period of accelerated development. Thought Leaders in these fields will showcase how each contributes a unique perspective and can propel you to new insights.

About mediaX at Stanford University


mediaX is a forum, an incubator of ideas, and a programmatic framework to support multi-disciplinary discovery relationships. Our initiatives explore how understanding people can improve the design of technologies – in the areas of learning, mobility, collaboration, entertainment and commerce.

As the industry affiliate program of the H-STAR Institute, mediaX programs are grounded on respect for different approaches to discovery and centered on our belief in the power of collaboration – between business and academic researchers, on campus and around the world.


For more information, visit: http://mediax.stanford.edu/