The First Annual Summit on the State of the Middle Class


April 25, 2013
9:00 am - 2:00 pm EDT
Experts examine the economic challenges and opportunities facing middle-class Americans

Programs


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About this conference


For more than a decade, the American middle-class has lived through economic uncertainty and challenge. For many Americans the goal of climbing the economic ladder has transformed into an effort to avoid slipping down it. The economic turmoil of the Great Recession and its aftermath has redefined the components and qualities of what it means to be Middle Class, opening the door for national and community leaders to create innovative solutions in the areas of education, jobs, the workforce, and beyond. Month after month, America's economic landscape is experiencing its most radical and wrenching upheaval since the Depression.

The latest Allstate - National Journal Heartland Monitor Poll and the accompanying First Annual Summit on the State of the Middle Class, the sixteenth in a series of groundbreaking surveys and events, will examine both the economic challenges and opportunities that Middle Class Americans face. This effort, building on the extensive journalism and polling already produced through the Next Economy project, will provide a vivid and comprehensive look at the state of middle-class life in America today.

About The Atlantic


Since 1857, The Atlantic has helped shape the national debate on the most critical and contentious issues of our times, from politics, business, and the economy, to technology, arts, and culture. Through in-depth analysis in the monthly print magazine, complemented by up-to-the-minute insights delivered throughout the day on theatlantic.com, The Atlantic provides the nation’s thought leaders and professional class with forward-looking, fresh perspectives that provoke and challenge, define and affect the lives we’re living today, and give shape to the lives we will live tomorrow.

For more information, visit: http://theatlantic.com