Bold Bets: California on the Move?


February 25, 2015
5:00 - 7:00 pm PST

Previews


Beyond Traffic: How We Will Travel in 2045

Carlos Monje, Jr. describes the Department of Transportation's “Beyond Traffic: Trends and Choices” plan, a 30-year outlook on everything from driverless cars, to bike shares, to Uber.

California's High-Speed Rail Is a High-Stakes Gamble

R. Sean Randolph, President and CEO of the Bay Area Council Economic Institute, describes California's bold bet on the future of high-speed rail.

High-Speed Rail or Elon Musk's Hyperloop?

Dan Richard, the chair of the California High-Speed Rail Authority, says high-speed train technology won't be going obsolete anytime soon.

High-Speed Rail Will Create More Jobs Than Keystone XL

Peter Haas, education director for the Mineta Transportation Institute, says high-speed rail projects create more - and better - jobs than the controversial oil pipeline.

About this conference


Join us for the first event in the Bold Bets series, as we convene California stakeholders in policy and economic development to consider the key infrastructure projects changing the landscape of mass movement. California has taken center stage in the transportation conversation, positioning itself at the forefront of innovation in highways, railroads, airports and urban metro systems. Our program will look toward the economic impact of investment and the potential value of developing these vital infrastructures. Is California, in fact, on the move? - and where may it be headed?

For more information, visit: http://www.theatlantic.com/live/events/bold-bets-sacramento/2015/

About The Atlantic


Since 1857, The Atlantic has helped shape the national debate on the most critical and contentious issues of our times, from politics, business, and the economy, to technology, arts, and culture. Through in-depth analysis in the monthly print magazine, complemented by up-to-the-minute insights delivered throughout the day on theatlantic.com, The Atlantic provides the nation’s thought leaders and professional class with forward-looking, fresh perspectives that provoke and challenge, define and affect the lives we’re living today, and give shape to the lives we will live tomorrow.

For more information, visit: http://theatlantic.com